8511 NW 61st Street, Miami, FL 33166
Monday-Friday : 8:00am - 4:30pm
8511 NW 61st Street, Miami, FL 33166
Monday-Friday : 8:00am - 4:30pm
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  • Your Questions. Our Answers
    Frequently Asked Questions
    What type of fuel is best?

    A:  There are many advantages and disadvantages to different types of fuel. Nearly all Generators use either gasoline, diesel, natural gas or propane. The following information will hopefully answer any questions or concerns you may have concerning different fuel sources.

    Gasoline:

    • Advantages:
      • Common fuel source - easily obtained
      • Increases portability of smaller generators
    • Disadvantages:
      • Highly flammable
      • Short shelf life (approximately 12 months)
      • Storing large quantities is hazardous
      • May not be available during power outages
      • Somewhat Expensive ($1.50 to $2.00 per Gallon)
      • Inefficient

    Propane:

    • Advantages:
      • Long shelf life
      • Clean burning
      • Easily stored in both large tanks or in smaller 5 - 10 gallon cylinders
      • Obtainable during power outages - gas stations may be unable to pump fuel during an area wide outage
    • Disadvantages:
      • Pressurized cylinder of flammable gas
      • Fuel system is more complicated (increased possibility of failure)
      • Larger tanks are not aesthetically pleasing (unsightly)
      • Fuel system plumbing results in higher installation cost
      • Somewhat Expensive ($1.60 to $1.80 a gallon)

    Natural Gas:

    • Advantages:
      • Unlimited fuel source - refueling not necessary
      • Clean burning
      • Available during power outages
    • Disadvantages:
      • May be unavailable during natural disasters (earthquakes, etc)
      • Lower power output (30% less BTU's per unit than gasoline)
      • Fuel system plumbing results in higher installation cost
      • Not available in many areas

    Diesel:

    • Advantages:
      • Least flammable fuel source
      • Easily obtained
      • On site fuel delivery available
    • Disadvantages:
      • 18-24 month shelf life
      • Installing large storage tanks raises cost of system
      • May not be available during power outages
    What size generator do I need?

    A: Power requirements must be determined to properly size your generator. We are providing some steps to assist you in approximating the size generator for your power needs. Please keep in mind that unless you are qualified, you should use a certified electrician to determine your power needs. At Triton Power it is our goal to assist our customers in any way possible. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

    Steps to Determine Generator Requirements

    1. Determine your need. Do you want the generator to operate part or all of your home or office?
    2. Identify the appliances and/or tools the generator will need to power. The "Common Wattage Guide" below will help you determine your need.
    3. Determine the wattage for each appliance and tool you plan to use frequently.
    4. Identify motor and pump requirements. Use the motor and pump charts provided below.
    5. Calculate and total the wattage for the motors and pumps frequently used. Always use starting watts, not running watts, when determining the correct electrical load requirements.
    6. Total the wattage of the appliances & tools and the motors & pumps. Keep in mind that if you coordinate your power usage wisely you do not have to operate everything all at once. Therefore, for emergency use you don’t necessarily need to size the generator to operate everything simultaneously.
    7. Convert watts into kilowatts by dividing the watts in step VI. to determine the generator size required. Please note that it is suggested, although not absolutely necessary, to size the generator 20-25% over the size you determine your needs to be. This will allow room for future growth. For example, if you determine that you will need a 15 kW generator then it is advisable to purchase an 18 kW generator to accommodate future expansion.

    Common Wattage Guide

    Item Running Watts Starting Surge
    100 watt light bulb 100 100
    Radio AM/ FM stereo 50-200 50-200
    Radio CB 50 50
    Fan 200 200
    Television 300-400 300-400
    Microwave oven 700 1000
    Air conditioner 3250 5000
    Furnace fan (1/3 HP blower) 600 1800
    Vacuum cleaner 600 750
    Sump pump (1/3 HP) 700 2100
    Refrigerator/ Freezer 800 2400
    Freezer 500 1500
    6" circular saw 800 1000
    Floodlight 1000 1000
    1/2" electric drill 1000 1250
    Toaster 1200 1200
    Coffee maker 1200 1200
    Electric skillet 1200 1200
    14" electric chain saw 1200 1500
    1/2 HP water well pump 1000 3000
    Hot plate 1500 1500
    Electric range 10000 10000
    10" table saw 2000 6000
    Hot water heater 5000 5000

     

    Electric Motor Wattage Requirements

    Electrical motors present special electrical startup considerations. They can require up to three times their rated running wattage to start. Motor nameplates generally will show starting watts, some as high as nine times the running wattage. Check the nameplate to be sure. Be certain to use the starting watts when figuring the correct electrical load requirements. Motor load requirements are listed below:

    Motor Rating HP Approximate Running Watts Universal Motors Small Appliance Reduction Induction Motors Capacitor Motors
    1/8 275 400 600 850
    1/4 400 500 850 1050
    1/3 450 600 975 1350
    1/2 600 750 1300 1800
    3/4 850 1000 1900 2600
    1 1000 1250 2300 3000
    1 1/2 1600 1750 3200 4200
    2 2000 2350 3900 5100
    3 3000 3550 5200 6800
    ** Motors of higher HP are not generally used.

     

    Water Well Pump kW Requirements

    Pump HP Rating Externally Regulated Generator Internally Regulated Generator
    Min. KW Min. KVA Min. KW Min. KVA
    1/3 1.5 1.9 1.2 1.5
    1/2 2.0 2.5 1.5 1.9
    3/4 3.0 3.8 2.0 2.5
    1 4.0 5.0 2.5 3.125
    1 1/2 5.0 6.25 3.0 3.8
    2 7.5 9.4 4.0 5.0
    3 10.0 12.5 5.0 6.25
    5 15.0 18.75 7.5 9.4
    7 1/2 20.0 25.0 10.5 12.5
    10 30.0 37.5 15.0 18.8

     

    Notes:

    • It is recommended that the generator be started before the pump motor is turned on.
    • A majority of industrial generators are externally regulated. Generators must be sized to deliver at least 65% of the rated voltage during motor starting to ensure adequate motor starting torque.
    • Industrial generators typically produce 300+ percent of rated capacity for 15-20 seconds during electrical surges.
    • To convert KW into watts multiply KW (x) 1000.
    How do I convert AMPS to kW or KVA?

    A: Use the following conversion charts:

    3 Phase Amperes - 80% Power Factor

    KVA
    KW
    208V
    220V
    240V
    380V
    416V
    440V
    480V
    6.3
    5
    17.5
    16.5
    15.2
    9.6
    8.6
    8.3
    7.6
    9.4
    7.5
    26.1
    24.7
    22.6
    14.3
    13
    12.3
    11.3
    12.5
    10
    34.7
    33
    30.1
    19.2
    17.3
    16.6
    15.1
    18.7
    15
    52
    49.5
    45
    28.8
    26
    24.9
    22.5
    25
    20
    69.5
    66
    60.2
    38.4
    34.7
    33.2
    30.1
    31.3
    25
    87
    82.5
    75.5
    48
    43.4
    41.5
    37.8
    37.5
    30
    104
    99
    90.3
    57.6
    52
    49.8
    45.2
    45
    36
    125
    118
    108
    68
    62.5
    59
    54
    56.3
    45
    156
    147
    135
    85.5
    78
    74
    68
    62.5
    50
    173
    165
    152
    96
    86
    83
    76
    75
    60
    208
    198
    181
    115
    104
    99.6
    91
    93.8
    75
    261
    247
    226
    143
    130
    123
    113
    100
    80
    278
    264
    240
    154
    139
    133
    120
    125
    100
    347
    330
    301
    192
    173
    166
    150
    156
    125
    433
    413
    375
    240
    217
    208
    188
    187
    150
    520
    495
    450
    288
    260
    249
    225
    219
    175
    608
    577
    527
    335
    304
    289
    264
    250
    200
    694
    660
    601
    384
    347
    332
    301
    312
    250
    866
    825
    751
    480
    434
    415
    376
    375
    300
    1040
    990
    903
    576
    521
    498
    451
    438
    350
    1220
    1155
    1053
    672
    607
    581
    527
    500
    400
    1390
    1320
    1203
    770
    694
    665
    602
    625
    500
    1735
    1650
    1504
    960
    868
    830
    752
    750
    600
    2080
    1970
    1803
    1141
    1042
    985
    903
    812
    650
    2257
    2135
    1958
    1236
    1129
    1067
    978
    937
    750
    2605
    2463
    2257
    1426
    1303
    1232
    1128

     

    Single Phase Amperes

    KVA
    120\240
    5
    20.8
    8
    33.3
    10
    41.6
    15
    62.5
    20
    83.3
    25
    104
    30
    125
    35
    145
    40
    166
    45
    187
    50
    208
    60
    250
    65
    270
    76
    312
    80
    333
    100
    416
    125
    520
    150
    625
    175
    729
    200
    833
    225
    937
    230
    958
    260
    1041
    275
    1145
    300
    1250
    350
    1458
    400
    1666
    425
    1770
    450
    1876
    500
    2083

     

    Nema Codes for Starting KVA/hp 3 Phase Motors*

    CODE
    STARTING KVA/HP
    TYPICAL SIZE RANGE
    CODE
    STARTING KVA/HP
    TYPICAL RANGE
    A
    0 - 3.15
    -
    L
    9.0 -10.0
    1 HP
    B
    3.15 - 3.55
    -
    M
    10.0 - 11.2
    Less than 1 HP
    C
    3.55 - 4.0
    -
    N
    11.2 - 12.5
    -
    D
    4.0 - 4.5
    -
    P
    12.5 - 14.0
    -
    E
    4.5 - 5.0
    -
    R
    14.0 - 16.0
    -
    F
    5.0 -5.6
    15 HP and up
    S
    16.0 - 18.0
    -
    G
    5.6 - 6.3
    10 HP
    T
    18.0 - 20.0
    -
    H
    6.3 - 7.1
    7.5 and 5 HP
    U
    20.0 - 22.4
    -
    J
    7.1 - 8.0
    3 HP
    V
    22.4 and up
    -
    K
    8.0 - 9.0
    2 and 1-1/2
         
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